Defrauding Homeowners | The Advocacy For Consumer Rights

Posted by & filed under Fraud.

David Gotterup was charged for 11 counts including mail fraud, bank fraud, and wire fraud. Between 2008 and 2012 he defrauded distressed homeowners looking for mortgage modifications. He convinced more than 1,000 people to give him money After Hurricane Sandy he used a low-interest disaster relief loan to pay for his wedding instead of repairing damages. His conviction is a part of Obama’s Financial Fruad Enforcement Task Force.

Click here to read the full article on RealEstateRama.

How Creditor Grammar Fraud Can Hurt You | The Advocacy For Consumer Rights

Posted by & filed under Grammar.

Whether you are a private citizen, business owner or public figure, as some point you will be expected to sign a contract with a creditor. Whether you are looking for a loan, mortgage or credit card, these contracts have an abundance of specific sections that you need to review before signing. Lots of people skip these and simply sign on the line to get what they need. However, this can lead you down a terrible path because creditor grammar fraud exists to hurt you. This type of fraud is designed to trick you into signing a contract you cannot possibly fulfill.

 

The Mathematics of Grammar

The grammar of languages throughout the world is based in math. The mathematical concepts associated with grammar are easy for a professional to detect. The laws which govern language are in place to make sure that you understand everything that is being said. These laws can be manipulated so that you think one thing is being said when, really, the speaker means something totally different.

 

Creditors Use This Against You

This confusion is easy to create and manipulate. Creditors can use this confusion to trick you into signing a contract you do not understand. When common words are used in uncommon ways, it is tempting to just assume a meaning instead of asking for clarification and a rewrite of the contract. This can cause you to not fulfill the terms of your contract, which can result in a lawsuit. This is called creditor grammar fraud because they are intentionally deceiving you into agreeing to something that is purposefully unclear.

Understanding contract grammar as well as creditor grammar fraud can help you steer clear of contracts that will open you up to a lawsuit. Your life and possessions are important and keeping them safe from harm is your duty. A firm specializing in false grammar detection can help you avoid misleading contracts and get you out from under unfounded lawsuits.

 

If you are reading this on anything other than The Advocacy For Consumer Rights it is stolen content. Follow us  on Twitter @TAFCR and visit our blog at http://theadvocacyforconsumerrights.org/blog.

Whistleblower Complaint at Jerry Brown | The Advocacy For Consumer Rights

Posted by & filed under Lawsuits.

A frivolous lawsuit is a lawsuit that is intended to harass or delay an opposing party. A lawsuit can be deemed frivolous from the lawsuit itself, a baseless motion, a dfendents answer, or an appeal without an arguable basis. If you can stop a frivolous lawsuit the defendent using has their legal fees paid for by the frivolous party because there was no basis to their case.

 

Click here to read more at Legal Dictionary.

Understanding Contract Grammar | The Advocacy For Consumer Rights

Posted by & filed under Grammar.

When you sign a contract, you need to understand everything in the document. Having a lawyer review your contract can help you understand, but there are certain other services that can give you a more firm footing. A company specializing in fraudulent grammar detection can help you understand if there is any misleading grammar in your contract. Contract grammar is incredibly important to the validity of the contract, as well as your own personal safety when signing such a document.

What is Contract Grammar?

Grammar is an important part of every contract. Grammar has set rules that need to be followed in every language ever spoken. As such, contract grammar is a simple use of laws that govern communication is the chosen language. One of the fundamental functions of grammar is to make it clear what is being said and by whom. A contract must adhere to that principle. The grammar in contracts must be plain and easy to read. This will reduce confusion and misunderstandings, which can result is an unfulfilled contract.

What Can Fraudulent Grammar Lead To?

Fraudulent grammar within a contract can lead to a lawsuit. When a contract is unclear because the grammar is intentionally convoluted, you should not sign it. If you do and it is later revealed that you have not fulfilled the terms of the contract because you did not understand them in the first place, the contract holder has grounds to sue you. Sometimes, this flawed grammar is by design. Some contract holders will intentionally mislead you so that they can sue you when you do not deliver what you did not know they wanted.

If you are reading this on anything other than The Advocacy For Consumer Rights it is stolen content. Follow us  on Twitter @TAFCR and visit our blog at http://theadvocacyforconsumerrights.org/blog.

Goldman-Sachs and NY Fed Reserve Case | The Advocacy For Consumer Rights

Posted by & filed under Government, Lawsuits.

Rohit Bansal is being charged for leaking documents from The New York Federal Reserve to Goldman Sachs. He had previously worked at both companies and many ex-employees of Goldman Sachs have moved to goverment agencies leading to the nickname, “Government Sachs”. The whistleblower in this case has been fired from the Federal Reserve against whistleblower protection laws.

Click here to read the full article by Dan Wright on ShadowProof.

Consumer Rights You Are Giving Away | The Advocacy For Consumer Rights

Posted by & filed under Consumer Protection.

Consumers were outraged last year when General Mills changed their legal terms to mandatory arbitration, meaning you could not sue the company for any wrong doing. They changed the terms back in just a few days. Te National Association of Consumer Advocates notes that many contracts you sign including Netflix, Verizon, Groupon, home agreements, and financial services always have these terms in the fine print. Consumer Reports believes that customers should not be forced into these clauses and warn customers to: looks for exceptions, try to opt out, and make noise to companies to stop using these clauses.

Click here to read the full article by Consumer Reports on Harrtford Courant.

Understanding Contract Grammar | The Advocacy For Consumer Rights

Posted by & filed under Fraud.

A contract becomes void if there is a misrepresented statement in the context. There are two ways a statement can be misrepresented, a false statement of fact or a inducement to break the contract.Even an opinion statement can be considered a false statement of fact if the person has special knowledge about the topic and they tell you an opinion, which you take in as a fact, that turns out to be false. An inducement to break the contract must folllow these terms:

  • There must have been a material statement
  • This statement must have been made known to the claimant
  • The maker of the statement intended it to be acted upon
  • The claimant must have actually acted upon the statement

Click here to read the full article on In Breif.

If you think you are in a false contract call The Advocacy For Consumer Rights for a free review or fill out our form here.

 

Goldman-Sachs and NY Fed Reserve Case | The Advocacy For Consumer Rights

Posted by & filed under Whistleblower.

 

Have you ever wondered how whistleblowers – people who inform authorities about illegal activities in a workplace – protect themselves from retaliation by the organizations they inform on? Whistleblower claim filing is a brave thing to do, and these people are worthy of protection. One of the most common ways they protect themselves is by reaching out to a consumer rights advocacy group.

 

Why Whistleblowers Blow the Whistle

To understand how they protect themselves, you must first understand why whistleblowers do what they do. There are a number of reasons why someone would inform the authorities about the illegal or fraudulent activities of their employer. One of the most common reasons is to protect the public from further fraud. For example, if a company such as a mortgage lender is misusing the mathematical laws of grammar to deliberately mislead or confuse clients, a whistleblower believes people have the right to know this. Compensation is another reason: if the information supplied results in legal prosecution, the whistleblower may be entitled to compensation. Whatever the motives, it can be extremely difficult to prove fraudulence, particularly in the case of a company misusing the laws of grammar. Enter the advocacy group.

 

How the Advocacy Group Helps the Whistleblower

First of all, the advocacy group acts as a shield. A company can intimidate an individual, but there is little it can do to a consumer rights group that has the power of knowledge and the law backing it up. The advocacy group will also help the whistleblower take the correct actions because they know what grammatical evidence is required to make a case. An advocacy group can also ensure that an individual gets proper compensation.

 

Whistleblower claim filing can be scary, but with the force of a consumer rights advocacy group behind them, whistleblowers can protect millions of people from fraud. Contact a group today if you think your employer is cheating people with confusing contracts.

If you are reading this on anything other than The Advocacy For Consumer Rights it is stolen content. Follow us  on Twitter @TAFCR and visit our blog at http://theadvocacyforconsumerrights.org/blog.

Fraudulent Grammar and Frivolous Lawsuits | The Advocacy For Consumer Rights

Posted by & filed under Fraud.

UBS Financial Services of Puerto Rico is being charged by FINRA and the SEC for multiple charges of contract fraud, negligence, unsuitable investments, etc. and they are being charged with $33.5 million. FINRA is seeking an additional $1B in damages for arbitration claims. UBS Financial’s broker is also being charged in Puerto Rico Federal Court for misleading customers.

Click here to read the full article by Zacks on NASDAQ.

Banks are Violating The 2012 Settlement | The Advocacy For Consumer Rights

Posted by & filed under Banking, Government.

Three years ago the Attorney General Department decided that courts can step in if the banks continue mistreating homeowners during foreclosures and modifications. Over 60,000 complaints, which is probably underestimated, have been recieved since early 2014. One example is a women, Kimberly Cook, was afraid Bank of America was not going to renegotiate her loan and had received messages from them that her name was signed improperly without her initial and she had not submitted a form to them. The clerk she submitted her complaint with said that Bank of America had started t epaperwork for her foreclosure a month ago. Lenders are abusing striggling homeowners by still aaccepting payments and demanding paperwork several times while they are secretly foreclosing the consumers house. The problem is the settlement gave the banks a wide margin of error which causes these cases to go undetected.

Click here to read the full article by Jon Prior on Politico.